questfox Special Vocabulary Training for Speech2Text with new OOV feature

OOV – Out of vocabulary – questfox is sometimes leaving us speechless.

Week by week we see incredible advances in the development of our speech-to-text approach inside of questfox. One of the everlasting challenges is the wrong transcription of words which are not correctly understood in a specific context. 

If something is misspelled by a computer this normally happens when the word used is outside the standard vocabulary of the application. This tends to happen often when words are used in a company specific context. By the way this seems to be true for every single market research project.

When asking about a brand some may be asking for competitors with a very special name and a very special spelling. In these cases the transcription technology tends to fail to recognize those specific names. Technically speaking the words used are “out of vocabulary” (OOV). 

The questfox solution to the OOV problem: It is now possible to create a list of special words to be integrated in questfox. Everytime the transcription engine of questfox is used this list is sent to the transcription engine to have a better understanding of specific vocabulary used.

Here is our questfox experiment to test the tool with some less common brands

BrandTranscription without OOV ListTranscription with OOV List
questfoxquestfox questfox 
pangea labsPangea Labspangea LabsPangea Labs
questlogixauslogics 
Quest Logixx
Quest logics
questlogix 
Wisdom of Krautswisdom of crowdswisdom of crowds
Tjaereborg ReisenSherlock Reisen
Djerba Reisen
sherbrooke reisen
Djerba Kreisen
Tjaereborg Reisen
L’OréalLorealL’Oréal 
Comme des Garçonskomm DKVkomm digga Songcomme de garcon Gasthaus.com Digger
kommen die ganzen

As you can see the overall transcription results do improve. But some issues remain.

Those who use mixed spoken language inside one dictation process may be familiar with the fact that transcription only works for one language at a time and hardly ever for two languages simultaneously.

As questfox works with an “expected language” tag for the transcription everything which is far away from the expected language is difficult to understand by the tool. In our pretest language German it was not possible to capture the french brand “Comme des Garçons”. We also failed with our made up brand “Wisdom of Krauts” which is still not transcripted in the desired way. The correct spelling seems to dominate the process and we get the undesired transcription result even after putting it into the list of special words. 😦

The only questfox way to “correct” this spelling would be the use of Regular Expressions in the questlogix. By the way: questlogix is such a distinct word with no similarity in the dictionary that our integration in the list of special words did function right away. Here is how to use RegEx in questfox:

https://questfox.wordpress.com/2018/04/04/text2click-regular-expressions-available-in-questfox-questlogix/

Even while still in development we hope that you appreciate the publication of this feature and share your experience with us.

At first we defined the usage based on each questfox project as we believe that every specific project might have the same vocabulary issues inside one project. You can define your individual “Bag of Words” in the projects settings

The syntax is separate each word by comma. If you have several words just use them in a row
Word, word, word, combination of words, 

Our typical list would be
questfox, pangea labs, questlogix, what’s your quest?, Speech2Text

In questfox you can paste one list of words per project under

->Project Settings 
-> Special List of Words for Transcription / Out of Vocabulary (OOV)

Please share your gained knowledge about this feature.


Voices of pangea: 120 languages supported in voice and video question types in questfox for real-time transcription

pangea or pangaea?

The questfox development is managed by the Swiss company pangea labs. The idea of “pangea” was developed by the German researcher Alfred Wegener who described in this work “The Origin of Continents” (1912) the idea of a supercontinent, in times when all continents have been one.
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pangaea

Our company was called pangea labs after a project in 120 countries after which we reconsidered our business figuring that our mission was to bring all people on this now different planet back together again with software tools. This happened in 2006 in just one language which was English.

We are more than proud to announce a real pangea feature with the implementation of a set of 120 languages and variants of languages inside of questfox from now on. It is now possible to interview using the voice of the customer in the languages described underneath. questfox will be able to generate a text transcript from the selected language.

120 speech variants ready to be used in questfox

A user can select from a list of the following variants of a language. We know that this is a major step for the development of market research. We are aware of the fact that now everyone will be able to use that technology yet, but our mission is to support the planet with these kinds of tools to re-create the supercontinent on the basis of software.

The integrated languages are available for Voice and even video question types. The text-to-speech reading features are not yet supported.

Here is the list of languages already available in questfox (November 2019):

LanguageLanguage (German Name)
Afrikaans (Suid-Afrika)Afrikaans (Südafrika)
አማርኛ (ኢትዮጵያ)Amharisch (Äthiopien)
Հայ (Հայաստան)Armenisch (Armenien)
Azərbaycan (Azərbaycan)Aserbaidschanisch (Aserbaidschan)
Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesia)Indonesisch (Indonesien)
Bahasa Melayu (Malaysia)Malaiisch (Malaysia)
বাংলা (বাংলাদেশ)Bengalisch (Bangladesch)
বাংলা (ভারত)Bengalisch (Indien)
Català (Espanya)Katalanisch (Spanien)
Čeština (Česká republika)Tschechisch (Tschechische Republik)
Dansk (Danmark)Dänisch (Dänemark)
Deutsch (Deutschland)Deutsch (Deutschland)
English (Australia)Englisch (Australien)
English (Canada)Englisch (Kanada)
English (Ghana)Englisch (Ghana)
English (Great Britain)Englisch (Großbritannien)
‪English (India)‪Englisch (Indien)
English (Ireland)Englisch (Irland)
English (Kenya)Englisch (Kenia)
‪English (New Zealand)‪Englisch (Neuseeland)
English (Nigeria)Englisch (Nigeria)
English (Philippines)Englisch (Philippinen)
English (Singapore)Englisch (Singapur)
English (South Africa)Englisch (Südafrika)
English (Tanzania)Englisch (Tansania)
English (United States)Englisch (USA)
Español (Argentina)Spanisch (Argentinien)
Español (Bolivia)Spanisch (Bolivien)
Español (Chile)Spanisch (Chile)
Español (Colombia)Spanisch (Kolumbien)
Español (Costa Rica)Spanisch (Costa Rica)
Español (Ecuador)Spanisch (Ecuador)
Español (El Salvador)Spanisch (El Salvador)
Español (España)Spanisch (Spanien)
Español (Estados Unidos)Spanisch (USA)
Español (Guatemala)Spanisch (Guatemala)
Español (Honduras)Spanisch (Honduras)
Español (México)Spanisch (Mexiko)
Español (Nicaragua)Spanisch (Nicaragua)
Español (Panama)Spanisch (Panama)
Español (Paraguay)Spanisch (Paraguay)
Español (Perú)Spanisch (Peru)
Español (Puerto Rico)Spanisch (Puerto Rico)
Español (República Dominicana)Spanisch (Dominikanische Republik)
Español (Uruguay)Spanisch (Uruguay)
Español (Venezuela)Spanisch (Venezuela)
Euskara (Espainia)Baskisch (Spanien)
Filipino (Pilipinas)Philippinisch (Philippinen)
Français (Canada)Französisch (Kanada)
Français (France)Französisch (Frankreich)
Galego (España)Galizisch (Spanien)
ქართული (საქართველო)Georgisch (Georgien)
ગુજરાતી (ભારત)Gujarati (Indien)
Hrvatski (Hrvatska)Kroatisch (Kroatien)
IsiZulu (Ningizimu Afrika)Zulu (Südafrika)
Íslenska (Ísland)Isländisch (Island)
Italiano (Italia)Italienisch (Italien)
Jawa (Indonesia)Javanisch (Indonesien)
ಕನ್ನಡ (ಭಾರತ)Kannada (Indien)
ភាសាខ្មែរ (កម្ពុជា)Khmer (Kambodscha)
ລາວ (ລາວ)Lao (Laos)
Latviešu (latviešu)Lettisch (Lettland)
Lietuvių (Lietuva)Litauisch (Litauen)
Magyar (Magyarország)Ungarisch (Ungarn)
മലയാളം (ഇന്ത്യ)Malayalam (Indien)
मराठी (भारत)Marathi (Indien)
Nederlands (Nederland)Niederländisch (Niederlande)
नेपाली (नेपाल)Nepalesisch (Nepal)
Norsk bokmål (Norge)Norwegisch (Norwegen)
Polski (Polska)Polnisch (Polen)
Português (Brasil)Portugiesisch (Brasilien)
Português (Portugal)Portugiesisch (Portugal)
Română (România)Rumänisch (Rumänien)
සිංහල (ශ්රී ලංකාව)Singhalesisch (Sri Lanka)
Slovenčina (Slovensko)Slowakisch (Slowakei)
Slovenščina (Slovenija)Slowenisch (Slowenien)
Urang (Indonesia)Sundanesisch (Indonesien)
Swahili (Tanzania)Swahili (Tansania)
Swahili (Kenya)Swahili (Kenia)
Suomi (Suomi)Finnisch (Finnland)
Svenska (Sverige)Schwedisch (Schweden)
தமிழ் (இந்தியா)Tamilisch (Indien)
தமிழ் (சிங்கப்பூர்)Tamilisch (Singapur)
தமிழ் (இலங்கை)Tamilisch (Sri Lanka)
தமிழ் (மலேசியா)Tamilisch (Malaysia)
తెలుగు (భారతదేశం)Telugu (Indien)
Tiếng Việt (Việt Nam)Vietnamesisch (Vietnam)
Türkçe (Türkiye)Türkisch (Türkei)
اردو (پاکستان)Urdu (Pakistan)
اردو (بھارت)Urdu (Indien)
Ελληνικά (Ελλάδα)Griechisch (Griechenland)
Български (България)Bulgarisch (Bulgarien)
Русский (Россия)Russisch (Russland)
Српски (Србија)Serbisch (Serbien)
Українська (Україна)Ukrainisch (Ukraine)
עברית (ישראל)Hebräisch (Israel)
العربية (إسرائيل)Arabisch (Israel)
العربية (الأردن)Arabisch (Jordanien)
العربية (الإمارات)Arabisch (Vereinigte Arabische Emirate)
العربية (البحرين)Arabisch (Bahrain)
العربية (الجزائر)Arabisch (Algerien)
العربية (السعودية)Arabisch (Saudi-Arabien)
العربية (العراق)Arabisch (Irak)
العربية (الكويت)Arabisch (Kuwait)
العربية (المغرب)Arabisch (Marokko)
العربية (تونس)Arabisch (Tunesien)
العربية (عُمان)Arabisch (Oman)
العربية (فلسطين)Arabisch (Palästina)
العربية (قطر)Arabisch (Katar)
العربية (لبنان)Arabisch (Libanon)
العربية (مصر)Arabisch (Ägypten)
فارسی (ایران)Persisch (Iran)
हिन्दी (भारत)Hindi (Indien)
ไทย (ประเทศไทย)Thailändisch (Thailand)
한국어 (대한민국)Koreanisch (Südkorea)
國語 (台灣)Chinesisch, Mandarin (traditionell, Taiwan)
廣東話 (香港)Chinesisch, Kantonesisch (traditionell, Hongkong)
日本語(日本)Japanisch (Japan)
普通話 (香港)Chinesisch, Mandarin (vereinfacht, Hongkong)
普通话 (中国大陆)Chinesisch, Mandarin (vereinfacht, China)

3 Clicks away from your mother tongue in research

The languages are selected under question settings

question settings to enter the settings menue
Selection of an “expected language” inside of questfox.

Using speech in research still requires some technical tests upfront, but is a fantastic new feature and broadens the opportunities of research. We will continuously work on these feature sets and support the world with more and more pangea ideas soon.

How to analyze speech?

The voice of a person is transcribed into written text in questfox. As an option you can save the spoken word as an audio file. At the moment questfox will only offer you a look at the data but is not providing any specific analytic tools for voice or text. Little by little we develop these analytic parts together with software partners specialized in that field of research. Over time more and more partners will be able to offer analytic tools in their specific language. That is the return of the supercontinent pangea.